Derryveagh Mountains, County Donegal

The wild beauty of these mountains provides one of the high spots for a visit to Donegal. Errigal Mountain, the range’s tallest peak at 751m, attracts keen hikers the cream of the mountain scenery lies within Glenveagh National Park. Covering nearly 16,500 ha, this takes in the beautiful valley occupied by Lough Veagh, and Poisoned Glen, a marshy valley enclosed by dramatic cliffs. The park also protects the largest herd of red deer in the country.

 

Glenveagh Castle stands on the southern shores of Lough Veagh, near the visitor’s centre. This splendid granite building was constructed in 1870 by John Adair, notorious for his eviction of many families from the area after the Famine. The castle was given to the nation in the 1970’s by its last owner, a wealthy art dealer from Pennsylvania.

 

Glebe House and Gallery overlooks Lough Gartan south of the visitor’s centre. This modest mansion was the home of the painter, Derek Hill who was also a keen collector. The house reveals his varied tastes, with William Morris wallpapers, Islamic ceramics and paintings by Tory island artists. The gallery contains work by Picasso, Renoir and Jack B Yeats among others.

 

The Colmcille Heritage centre, a short distance south uses stained glass and illuminated manuscripts to trace the life of St Columba who was born in nearby Church Hill in AD 521. A flagstone in the village is said to mark the site of the saint’s birth place.

 

The Derryveagh Mountains are a hidden gem, contact Ireland and Scotland Luxury Tours now to organise your Ireland tour.

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